Fixing NTUC FairPrice's instore campaign for Scan & Go

UX research and design to increase the the effectiveness of marketing signs
Impact
35k+
Merchants in 7 Asian countries using the redesign
3x
Easier to use*
*Based on scores of Single Ease Questions (SEQ) from usability studies
3x
Easier to use*
NTUC FairPrice is the largest supermarket chain in Singapore. In 2019, they released the Scan & Go app that allows shoppers to scan their grocery items as they shopped in their stores.
MY RoLE
Build a simpler, more intuitive web app
I worked with a core team of 3 UX researchers to plan and execute the project.
I was responsible for post-fieldwork data analysis, reporting, and proposing design and strategy recommendations.
TIME
Build a simpler, more intuitive web app
2020, 1 month
THe CONTEXT
Invisible marketing signs in the store
When NTUC FairPrice first launched the Scan & Go app, the app was only available in 2 locations in Singapore. Given the limited release, marketing efforts were largely done onsite with signs plastered around the store. 
A few months after the launch, NTUC’s UX team strongly suspected no one was looking at the signs but needed concrete proof to convince stakeholders.
GOALS
Improve the effectiveness of in-store marketing collaterals
Find out if shoppers looked at the Scan & Go marketing signs + deliver biometric/video evidence to convince clients’ stakeholders
Evaluate the effectiveness of in-store marketing collaterals
Provide design and strategy recommendations that would be incoporated into an internal playbook

Act 1: Research

Usability testing + Eye-tracking
To evaluate the effectiveness of the marketing signs, my team decided on:
A shopping task that would set participants on a route that would expose them to the relevant marketing signs we were testing
Use of eye-tracking equipment so that we could reliably track the what participants were seeing (or not) as they went about the store 
Recruiting 2 groups of participants (primed and unprimed) to understand how intent to use the Scan & Go app would affect the noticeability of the marketing signs
Making sense of our users and their workflows
As the data was collected, we made sense of what we learned about our merchants with techniques like: 
Personas - to group emerging patterns
CJMs - to understand merchant's end-to-end workflow
Workflow documentation - to 'see' what other interfaces merchants were exposed to as part of their work and leisure
*Actual research documents and full findings have been omitted to comply with NDA agreements.  
Making sense of our users and their workflows
As the data was collected, we made sense of what we learned about our merchants with techniques like: 
Personas - to group emerging patterns
CJMs - to understand merchant's end-to-end workflow
Workflow documentation - to 'see' what other interfaces merchants were exposed to as part of their work and leisure
*Actual research documents and full findings have been omitted to comply with NDA agreements.  
Instore research with 30 participants
During the actual fieldwork, we met participants outside the store, gave them the task, and told them to meet us at checkout. Off they went!
Making sense of our users and their workflows
As the data was collected, we made sense of what we learned about our merchants with techniques like: 
Personas - to group emerging patterns
CJMs - to understand merchant's end-to-end workflow
Workflow documentation - to 'see' what other interfaces merchants were exposed to as part of their work and leisure
*Actual research documents and full findings have been omitted to comply with NDA agreements.  
Making sense of our users and their workflows
As the data was collected, we made sense of what we learned about our merchants with techniques like: 
Personas - to group emerging patterns
CJMs - to understand merchant's end-to-end workflow
Workflow documentation - to 'see' what other interfaces merchants were exposed to as part of their work and leisure
*Actual research documents and full findings have been omitted to comply with NDA agreements.  
Examples of in-store marketing signs informing shoppers of Scan & Go. We identified all 9 types of marketing signs during the research planning and created a task that would force users to walk into the vicinity of these materials, giving all the signs a fair chance of being spotted.
Meeting participants outside the store. We met all 30 participants outside the store, gave them the task to buy a list of items and let them shop and explore the space. This enabled us to not lead them into seeing the in-store marketing collaterals.
Capturing natural behaviour using eye trackers. Eye-tracking equipment allowed us to 'see' a participant's POV without being obtrusive. We also needed the video evidence for the client to make a case to their stakeholders.
Retrospective interviews with 7 primed participants. These interviews enabled us to deep drive into the experiences of our participants. The unprimed participants were given a survey instead. 

Act 2: Analysis

Triangulating data for a fuller picture
I used both quantitative and qualitative data to 
Survey data was collected (in lieu of more extensive retrospective interviews) from the 20+ unprimed participants. The survey gave us a point of comparison between the notice rates between  primed and unprimed participants. 
Customer journey Maps were used to map out how participants' behaviours and goals changed as they went about their shopping, and how that change in turn affects how likely they were to see the marketing signs.
Heatmaps to 'see' where users looked as they walked through key parts of the store where the marketing signs were placed. This data helped the client understand where participants' attention were directed to instead of their signs
Pulling it all together. By layering qualitative data from user interviews with eye-tracking data, I was able to evaluate how understand how well each marketing collateral worked, and why they performed the way they did.
EVALUATION
Creating a framework to evaluate 'effectiveness'
The client had told us to measure the effectiveness of their collaterals, but hadn’t given much thought of how to define it. To help their internal teams and stakeholders grasp the nuances of how the marketing signs performed, I proposed a framework to frame all the insights and propose recommendations.
Looking into the future, this framework can be used in future usability tests to evaluate the performance of the changes.
The framework emerged from the findings we were getting. If I could go back and do it again, I would include the element of 'appeal' but I suppose that would expose the metric to a degree of subjectivity. 
Key Insights
Few participants saw the Scan & Go signs or managed to checkout with Scan & Go at first try. Why?
Full insights and strategy recommendations have been omitted to comply with NDA agreements
Participants were extremely task-focused on shopping
Participants tended to be focused on getting their groceries they would block out any marketing materials they deemed irrelevant to their search. Thus, they didn't see the signs even they came in front of them. 
The app's name was misleading
Upon hearing the name, many participants mistook the app as a payment app or a self-service checkout initiative. Thus they ignored everything until they were ready to pay at checkout. 
Poor signage placement
Signs were often placed at areas away from participant's main line of vision. Even when participants were intently looking for the Scan & Go at checkout, some of them could not find the correct place to checkout. 

How would you design an enterprise software for low tech users? 

Sign placements were often not in the line of vision. Since they were placed perpendicular to participant's line of vision, very few people noticed it. Even if they did, some would just quickly scan it, then mistake it as a payment app.
The Scan & Go checkout was not clearly differentiated from the self-checkout counters. The signs were not used effective to communicate the difference between the spaces, so several participants walked through the space without realising it was their destination. 

How might we make visible the marketing signs that shoppers ignore? 

Here's how I attempted the challenge

Act 3: Design Approach

I used both quantitative and qualitative data to 
1. DETERMINING SCOPE
Focusing on entrances and checkouts
The first step was to determine where the marketing signs would be most noticeable. This wasn't a simple task as we could not just look at the best performing sign and recommend amplifying efforts there.
Instead, to pinpoint the best points to put the marketing signs, I examined the eye-tracking videos and the customer journey map. From there, I realised that the best times to catch the attention of shoppers were at checkouts (located next to entrances) because shoppers were most likely to looking for checkout options during these times.
Additionally, these place are larger physical spaces that are easier to notice by passing shoppers. I thus focused my design efforts on improving the noticeability of these two junctions.
For the record, the best performing sign was at the weighing machine. Participants only noticed it because the task we gave them unwittingly caused them to struggle with the machine. For obvious reasons, we could not recommend making the weighing machines more frustrating to use.
Creating a checkout space with purpose
The biggest problem with the existing Scan & Go checkout space was that it felt transitory and meaningless, especially when they were juxtaposed next to the self-service checkouts. Participants and other shoppers would cruise through this space without realising it was actually the Scan & Go checkout space.
Could we make the space feel more substantial and purposeful while working in the confides of the allocated area?
Scan & Go checkout looking sad and lacking purpose in life. 3/7 of the primed participants walked through or past this area and into self-service, thinking that that was Scan & Go.
Self-service checkouts looked like a far more substantial space, especially with the rows of counters and bagging tables.
Designing for two viewing distances
Even if we could make the Scan & Go checkouts and entrances feel like a place with purpose, how could we get passing shoppers to notice it?
Looking at the eye-tracking videos, I discovered that participants tended to toggle between two kind of visions; a long-distance one that helped them scan ahead and pick up any interesting destinations to head to (essentially a Walt Disney Weenie), and a second short-range one to sort out issues or digest information in front of them.
Could we take advantage of this behaviour? I designed a template that would leverage it:
An example of a marketing collateral designed for two viewing distances. The top is meant to catch a shopper's interest from across the store, while the bottom section walks the interested shopper through setting up the Scan & Go app.
Clarifying USP with key visuals
As part of the previous approach, I suggested having a key anchoring visual that could instantly communicate what Scan & Go was about, and how it was different from self service checkouts.
I did a quick mockup of the key visuals so that out client could envision how things could look like on their own product  
Zooming in to the essentials of a phone scanning the barcode of groceries. I made sure to pack the basket with different types of groceries as some participant mistakenly assumed they could only use Scan & Go for fruits because that was the section they first encountered a marketing sign for Scan & Go. The illustration style was lifted from Scan & Go's own style to help the client envision the mockups as their own campaign.
An alternative showing a shopper scanning items on the go.

Act 4: Application

Bringing it all together
Tying all the recommendations together, we came up with a few reimagining of the client's checkout spaces.
Reimagining signs for the entrance
The client mentioned they couldn't make the original sign (about 1 metre wide) face shoppers due to stall restrictions. Okay, I thought, what if we made it skinny? Notice also the vinyl applied to the floor to tie the sign to the Scan & Go checkout area.
Reimagining of checkout space
This space was designed to be spotted from afar but also to make the Scan & Go checkout area feel substantial enough when next to the self-service checkout counters.
One of my my hypothesis was that if the kiosks needed a small table like structure in front of it to seem like a checkout counter. This is because all the self-service checkout counters in the background have such an affordance for shoppers to place their groceries.  
An improved campaign
The client were impressed by the design suggestions as it gave them a fresh perspective on the problems they were facing. A few months after, they rolled out a new digital and instore campaign that incorporated many of our design recommendations.
Standees were added at entrances, and featured the Weenie format and messaging recommended.
The new format allowed signs to stand out prominently from the surroundings. 
Visuals and messaging very closely matched the visuals we proposed.
Tables were added at checkouts to help customers realise this was a separate checkout option. 
Though the client has yet to return with the results of the new campaign, their incorporation of our design suggestions meant that they were able to use our work to align their own clients and chart a different direction. This testifies to the value of our research and impact of the proposed designs. 
35k+
Merchants in 7 Asian countries using the redesign
3x
Easier to use*
*Based on scores of Single Ease Questions (SEQ) from usability studies
3x
Easier to use*
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